Gabriel García Márquez
Gabriel García MárquezNo One Writes to the Colonel

No One Writes to the Colonel

3/5
(12 votos)
No One Writes to the Colonel

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I just finished reading "No One Writes to the Colonel", and I highly recommend it. I was already a fan of Gabriel Garcia Marquez after having read "One Hundred Years of Solitude", and now I admire him even more.
Marquez takes us back again to Macondo; hot as ever and filled with people full of madness, emptiness and living, still, in the shadow of the Buendía's. He is an absolute master of the craft; his images and characters are full of life and color.
It seemed to take a while to ship, but not excessively so. Also, a few of the pages were bent - not sure if this was pre-existing or if it happened during shipping.
The book and its popularity among a certain kind of readers in the erstwhile colonized third world countries explain a lot about those societies and their priorities and preferences. The colonel has been waiting for decades for a meagre pension while his friend Sabhas manages to accumulate some wealth by questionable means (how else,making profits!
A series of short stories from marquez that intrique the reader in the same sense his other novels have accomplished.
This story, about an old, sad Colonel who spends his time waiting for a pension that, deep down, he knows he will never receive, is simply heart-breaking. Every paragraph is laced with sadness - sadness that his circumstances are how they are and sadness that it won't ever really change, not even in the promised January when the rooster will finally pay off for him and his wife and they can finally put the memory of their dead son behind them.
Marquez has done it again, to weave a story of pathos and vividness which, even a gifted painter would find it difficult to portray. Set in a small Mexican town, the world of the Colonel and his wife along with the memories of his lost son and his parting rooster, become a symbol of defiance, a triumph of human spirit amidst the ruin and the debris that has come to haunt the Colonel in all possible forms.
Although there are a few minor events in Marquez's muted novella - a funeral, a trip to the casino, the arrival of a circus, a cockfight trial - the story is more concerned with the mundane fact of the colonel's repetitive everyday existence, his domestic rituals, walks, conversations, his waiting for the official letter confirming his pension that never comes. Details about the region's political situation and history filter through gradually, and despite a shortage of exterior detail, there is some local colour - the postmaster drinking pink froth as he makes his way through harbour stalls to meet the launch; the priest who gives movie censorship details by bell-ringing, spying on the cinema to note the disobedient.
Gabo's fatalism,meloncholy and agony continues in this Chef d'oeuvre making the reader believe that life is Despair as Kafka or Samuel Beckett experienced it.It's about a Colonel who had fought against the government for liberty, rights and freedom ..
Although there are a few minor events in Marquez's muted novella - a funeral, a trip to the casino, the arrival of a circus, a cockfight trial - the story is more concerned with the mundane fact of the colonel's repetitive everyday existence, his domestic rituals, walks, conversations, his waiting for the official letter confirming his pension that never comes. Details about the region's political situation and history filter through gradually, and despite a shortage of exterior detail, there is some local colour - the postmaster drinking pink froth as he makes his way through harbour stalls to meet the launch; the priest who gives movie censorship details by bell-ringing, spying on the cinema to note the disobedient.
I find this book very interesting. For one, it taught me what I like and don't like about short stories.
This was a pretty good book. No magical realism here though.

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